The Rockstar EULA — Why Lawyers NEED Better Spellchecking

After reading many legal arguments that insist a user/player/licensee needs to be copacetic to everything written in every contract they agree to, it warms the cochleas of my heart to see that Rockstar / Take-Two have yet again left another typo in their latest EULA (18 September 2018), this time not even managing to make it past the second paragraph.

No, “inclduing” is not a word. Maybe somebody (Hello Ms Feist) needs to disable the option to “Ignore capitalized words” in the Proofing section of their word processor.

But ultimately the irony is that even the lawyers who write these things clearly do not actually read them.

2018-12-05 – Interlocutory order

This is what was filed with the court, and what ultimately resulted in the Applicants’ deciding to agree to a short-order (that’s where both parties agree on a course of action), and the resultant order mentioned in this terribly biased report by zdnet.

https://www.zdnet.com/article/australian-court-awaits-paypal-to-release-funds-of-alleged-gta-v-software-cheat/

By presenting a short-order to the court, the Applicants’ avoided the risk of the court ruling against them, which would have been super embarrassing in the Public Relations department.

P.S. Here’s a fun game to play… when-ever anything about a cheating/modding legal action (whether positive or negative) is published, take a look a Take-Two’s stock price. Maybe I’m biased, but it seems that every time anything to do with cheats appears in an article, the stock price drops. My theory is that it reminds all the prospective investors who are keen to cash in on RDR2 micro-transactions, that they really jumped the shark the last time they tried.